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Critical Analysis

by J.Drucker

Design Features

typographic: Basic humanistic font, probably Garamond, used in fiction/prose page layouts.

imagery: Found, appropriated, recycled, again typical of the postmodern 1990s sensibility

graphical: Layouts vary from opening to opening, sometimes carrying a prose format across a few pages, punctuated by xeroxed frogs, charming princes, or women in 1950s clothing, or other graphic event.

openings: More de facto that designed, with incidental dialogues occuring but no strong undergirding of structure.

turnings: As incidental as the openings, they have a surprise to them on account of the range of materials in the piece, but aren't particularly well articulated as elements.

development: A story weaves throughout, but the book moves in chunks in segments.

sequence:

textual: Narrative and fiction, parodic in places, descriptive in others, the whole is a pastiche of varia.

structure: Paperback look and feel, very much like a 1940s or 1950s pulp romance.

conceptual: The parodic reference frame forms the basic conceptual element.

intratextual:

scultpural features:

temporal features:

other features:

Critical Discussion

A cute and clever book, awkwardly made, but self-aware with regard to its conventions and play. The thematic drives the work, and the page to page varity of stamps, collaged elements, xeroxed bits, and so on gives the whole thing a personal scrap-book feel that is engaging without being fussy or precious. The distinctly edgy up-to-date young feminist twists are very postmodern style 1990s appropriation and detournement, with a culture-jamming hipster sensibility throughout. More playful than angry, but distinctly counter-culture and anti-mainstream, the book appeals to young women readers in particular for whom these cliches still have power. The production values could be higher, and in many ways this is more like a dummy for a finished work than it is a finished book, but the hand-made-ness has charm and the project pulls itself together. A certain poignancy comes through the whole, especially as the young woman narrator's longings are palpable, and her frustrations, in spite of the arch play with received genre languages.

Detailed Analysis
General Comments

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The Return of the Liposuctioned Corpse: Love Letters to Madmen

Agents

Elissa Joy

type: initiating

role:
artist
author


Ian Phillips

type: other

role:
designer


Pas de Chance

type: initiating

role:
publisher

location: Toronto


Ralph Alfonso

type: other

role:
printer Printed the section "We're Desperate Get Used To It"


Elissa Joy

type: initiating

role:
artist
author


Ian Phillips

type: other

role:
designer


Pas de Chance

type: initiating

role:
publisher

location: Toronto


Ralph Alfonso

type: other

role:
printer Printed the section "We're Desperate Get Used To It"


Publication Information

edition type: editioned

publisher: pas de chance

place: Toronto, Ontario, Canada

dates:
publication: 1993-00-00

Measurements

vertical: 7 inches closed

horizontal: 4.25 inches closed

Production Information

production means:
xerographic (local)
collage (local)

binding: adhesive (local)

substrate:
bookBlock: paper

media:
collage (AAT)

other materials:

Appearance

general description:

format: book object (AAT)

cover: The cover features a photocopied color image of a woman handing mail to a male postal worker, whose face is covered by a cartoon image of a winking pumpkin. The woman, with both 50s attire and hairdo, is looking down at her brown dog, whose leash is wrapped around her wrist as they stand beside the postal truck.

color: yes Bright colors are featured throughout the work in printed images and paste-in images (stickers, photos, etc.).

devices:

Content

pagination: unpaginated 54

numbered?: unnumbered

signed?: unsigned